Quick Answer: Should Parents Take Away Phones At Night?

Should 17 year olds have a bedtime?

Both the National Sleep Foundation and the American Academy of Sleep Medicine agree that teens need between 8 and 10 hours of sleep per night.

Getting this recommended amount of sleep can help teens maintain their physical health, emotional well-being, and school performance..

Is it bad to keep your phone in your room at night?

Cell phones (and tablets, TVs, and other gadgets with LED screens) give off what’s known as blue light—a type that studies suggest can inhibit the production of the sleep-inducing hormone melatonin and disrupt our circadian rhythms. … Better yet, keep your phone and laptop in another room while you slumber.

Should a 12 year old have a phone?

At what age should you get your child a cell phone? According to PewResearch Center, the average age is between 12 and 13, but when to get your child a cell phone is a personal decision, and can vary from kid to kid based on maturity and need.

Can my parents take my phone if I pay for it?

Long answer: As long as you are a minor, your parents are responsible for you. This includes your behavior, your appearance, and your belongings. So yes, they can take away anything at any time, whether you paid for it or not. … For whatever reason, your parents say no, you can’t go.

Should a 14 year old have a phone?

Most teens — 85% of those aged 14 to 17 — have cell phones. … For your teen, having a phone offers the same kind of security it does for you. — knowing that you’re just a call or text away. Teens also may see having a phone as part of fitting in with their friends.

When should a 13 year old go to sleep?

Children at this age typically go to bed between 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. and wake up around 6 a.m. and 8 a.m., just as they did when they were younger.

Why you shouldn’t take your child’s phone at night?

The bottom line: When parents take away cell phones at night, they’re helping to ensure this natural sleep process can occur, so their teenager can get a decent’s night rest. In the case of your daughter, the “trust” line is a trap. Don’t go there. This is about providing a safe environment for your family.

Should I let my teenager sleep in?

Adequate sleep is necessary for good health, and can reduce the likelihood of risky behaviors in both teens and adults. 9 hours of sleep is the magic number for teens. It’s difficult for students to hit this mark during the school year, so it could be a good idea to let your teen catch up on sleep this summer.

Should I take my 15 year olds phone at night?

Yes definitely. It removes the temptation to be online when they should be resting and the light from the phones is proven to disturb our deep restorative sleep patterns. I used to so that my child could sleep and for their physical and mental health, but there were so many tantrums and tears!

How do you convince your parents to let you keep your phone at night?

Suggest to them the possibility of a trial period. Ask what it is they don’t want you to do? Volunteer not to do that while in your room with your phone. Suggest (don’t demand; don’t insist; just suggest in a polite, respectful way) that you can do that.

Should a 14 year old have a bedtime?

Most teenagers need 8-10 hours of sleep each night. Some need as little as 7 hours or as much as 11 hours. It’s very common for children in the early teen years to start wanting to go to bed later at night and get up later in the morning.

Why Parents shouldn’t look through their child’s phone?

In fact, it can lead to a host of unwanted consequences, like building mutual distrust between you and your children. It can backfire and encourage them to try even harder to hide risky behavior because they know you’re looking for it. Yet, surveys say it’s quite common for parents to digitally snoop on their kids.

How late should 13 year olds stay up?

That said: “9pm is a sensible approach.” For teenagers, Kelley says that, generally speaking, 13- to 16-year-olds should be in bed by 11.30pm.

Should parents take away phones?

Psychologists believe that in order to stop this culture of entitlement, the overprotective instincts must be curbed. This means parents taking away the thing that kids feel attached to the most — their phone — as a form of punishment.